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TOPIC: Dog aggresion

Dog aggresion 25 Jan 2013 17:29 #8029

  • philsniko
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Niko is a 14 month old intact male, he is an extremely affectionate and loving dog to all people of all ages.

When we have him out on walks he is always on a lead due to his poor recall, he is regularly being barked at and snarled at by other dogs whilst on his walks all of these dogs are small terrier types.

He rarely displays any aggresion to these dogs and seem to ignore their antics.

However there have been 4 occasions when one of these dogs have come within striking distance which he did within a blink of an eye, there was no growling or any display of aggresion until he literally latched on, it is as if he bears a grudge and stores the information for when they stray too close.

I can normally manage to keep him out of harms way but when passing one of his aggressors the other evening and being on slippy snow I was unable to control and he attacked this other dog who at the time wasn't displaying any aggression but has done so on many other accasions.

He regularly plays with a female german shephard but we are very concerned and wary in letting him greet any dogs of any size now.

I am looking for advice, should we muzzle, should we halter, should we look to find a behaviour expert. We did attend puppy training and he loved it in a class of 15 other assorted dogs so he was well socilaized.

Any advise would be welcome.

Thank you

Re: Dog aggresion 25 Jan 2013 18:20 #8031

My Asia has the same dislike of terriors, Akita's do seem to have very long memories and my Asia will remember a certain garden or place where another dog has had a "pop" at her, when she passes that same garden or other place she will always make sure she has a very hard look around, I know she's looking for the dog that had a go at her. I and many others have problems with terriors, they do seem to take a dislike to akitas. The last incedent I had with 2 shitzues (spelling) was when they were both off lead and came straight for her, the owner was out of sight and when he did turn up he said that his dogs were very aggressive, so why the flipping heck did he have them off lead!!! anyway as one of the dogs was hanging off Asia she had a pop back at it, I could do nothing, it was a lot of noise and everything ended okay, but I had to avoid the area for ages so that Asia could stop getting "huffy and puffy", she's okay now

Personally I always cross the road if I see any other dogs coming, even if it's a dog that Asia gets on okay with. A little trick you could try is to give Niko a treat when you see a terrior aproaching, hold the treat just in front of his nose as you continue to walk and once you've passed the other dog let him have the treat, don't let him look back at the dog either, Asia's a proper one for doing that In time Niko will learn that he gets treats when another dog is around and he'll start to look at you for his treat instead of eyeballing the other dog.

Personally I don't think his behaviour warrents a muzzle, if people see him muzzled they can become complacement and get too close ot him, he'll proberly feel more defensive if he's muzzled and he could get a reputation simply because he's wearing a muzzle. As long as he's on a lead at all times you are seen as the one who's dog in under control the off lead owner is the one who's out of order
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Last Edit: 25 Jan 2013 23:42 by bensonsmum. Reason: spelling

Re: Dog aggresion 25 Jan 2013 18:49 #8036

  • Joomla
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My boy Shiro is now 10.5yrs and from 10mths old he has been attacked over 30 times by off lead dogs, the worst was a Boarder terrorist, he would continually have a go at Shiro. I have never muzzled him as he is on lead all the time and he has the right to defend himself against off lead aggressors. Unfortunatly he will get aggressive with other dogs of similar breeds, and it will probably be with males, but he could have a go at bitches of the same breed.
If he has been playing with the GS bitch since he was a pup, or at least for the past few months, he will realise that she is a playmate, but he will be coming aware that he is male and will possibly start to mount the GS girl even if she has been speyed.
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Re: Dog aggresion 27 Jan 2013 10:47 #8053

  • oldclaypaws
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Akitas are unpredictable with other dogs- you don't know how either will react and what signals they are giving each other.

Rubes likes some and will wag a tail, then a similar dog on a seperate occasion she acts shirty.

Best bet is keep yours under control and avoid other dogs as far as possible- find those quiet country lanes and more remote locations, then you've less chance of an issue. Teenage (14 months) is the usual age when they go from submissive/playful to more adult role, which can include dominance and standing their ground.

Don't think you are experiencing anything unusual, its par for the course, eventually you get a bit thick skinned and take it in your stride.

If terriers come up to you being aggressive while yours is under control, you are not in the wrong and its called natural selection. One of the compensations of having an Akita is they are pretty bullet proof if another dog has a pop.
Last Edit: 27 Jan 2013 17:14 by oldclaypaws. Reason: grammatical error

Re: Dog aggresion 27 Jan 2013 11:15 #8054

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I just want to qualify that remark incase it sounds mildly nonchalant about dog on dog action, its very upsetting if dogs have handbags at each other, but its part of doggy life. In nature they don't sit down and sign peace treaties. Strange dogs are usually seen as a threat and whose territory it is gets settled by a tussle. This behaviour is supressed when they are domesticated, we discourage their natural more aggressive behaviour but it tends to show with other dogs in public places and to be worse on a lead or worst of all in a car.

You can bet 'in the hypothetical wild' a pack of 'cute' Westies or Bichon Frises' would rip an intruding Yorky to pieces, but put them in a park with a pink lead and a bell and we think they are little fluffy people called Foo-Foo or whatever. No, they are little wolf descendants.

The law seems to actually see this and understand it where dog on dog is concerned. Although dog fighting is now seen as barbaric and illegal (this wasnt due to animal welfare concerns, it was because all animal fighting was seen as a distraction from people going to church), the law now thinks if two dogs have had a pop in a park, thats what dogs do and there's no owner particularly at fault. As such if a Jack Russell comes up and bites your Akita, their is no obvious route for compensation or interest from the police. If it bites you, thats a different matter- the terrorist can be destroyed if found guilty and the owner fined or imprisoned for failing to control their dog.


Answer- keep dog under control, expect occasion handbags and try to take it in your stride, try to find places to walk where their are fewer dogs if its a regular issue.

I found the ultimate answer is buy a woodland- loads of space for hounds to run round chasing squirrels and snuffling, no other dogs in sight.
Last Edit: 27 Jan 2013 17:17 by oldclaypaws. Reason: spelling

Re: Dog aggresion 30 Jan 2013 05:36 #8069

  • philsniko
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We have tried a Halti on Niko, the info on line said it would take up to a week for a dog to get used and accept a halti. I tried him on a short walk, planned for 10 mins, he took to it without any problem at all, 10 minutes turned into 45 minutes we haven't looked back, he is a differant dog. Previously he tended to pull here and there he is now so easy to walk, I would cetainly recommend Halti's on this experience.

When approaching any dogs now we can easily control where he is looking and he doesn't protest, hopefully this is a turning point.
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